Tree Safety

Why Your Tree Company Should Have Insurance

When it comes to hiring a tree company, there are many things to look for. 

For starters, you should consider their experience and reviews of former customers. You’ll also want to learn about their specific services, like tree pruning or tree planting. And then, of course, you’ll want to consider the actual cost of their professional services.

But before you can move forward, there’s one more box that needs to be checked: insurance. 

After all, if you hire a tree company without full insurance coverage, you’ll simply create a recipe for disaster.

In this article, we’ll break down the reasons why your tree company should always have insurance.

The Nature of Working with Mother Nature

First, it helps to understand the liability that comes with tree service work.

The tree care field is one of the most dangerous industries in the country. From extreme heights to electrical lines, workers are regularly exposed to high-risk situations. Tree care employees are also required to operate sharp and heavy equipment.

The job is even more dangerous after storms, when conditions are more slippery than usual.

Most importantly, Mother Nature is unpredictable. A dying tree branch, for example, can fall without warning. This is why it’s crucial to work with an experienced and knowledgeable tree service company like Friendly Tree.

Insurance Protects Both You and the Tree Company 

Due to the dangerous nature of tree care, it’s critical to hire a company that has insurance. Specifically, they should have general liability insurance and workers’ compensation.

If a tree worker is injured on your property, workers’ compensation will cover their medical bills. But if they get hurt on your property and don’t have insurance, the company or worker can potentially sue you.

Plus, if you knowingly hire a company without insurance, your home insurance probably won’t pay the claim.

Insurance also protects against structural damages. For instance, if a tree worker prunes a tree and a heavy branch falls on your roof or car, their insurance will cover it.

Of course, no one wants accidents or injuries to happen. However, anything is possible, and it’s always best to be prepared.

Your Tree Company Should Also Have Certified Arborists and Tree Experts

In addition to insurance, your tree company should also have certified and licensed tree experts.

These experts have completed a high standard of training, licensing, and certifications. This ensures that they’ll get the job done — and do it right.

It also means that they have received proper safety training, thus reducing the risk of injuries and accidents.

Keep this in mind if another business, like a landscaping company, attempts to offer you tree services. While they might have insurance, their workers aren’t professional trained to handle the job.

Moreover, their insurance likely won’t cover the same scenarios tree workers encounter each day.

Call the Friendly Experts at Friendly Tree

As you can see, there are many reasons why your tree company should have insurance. It protects everyone involved, from the client to the business.

With Friendly Tree, you won’t have to wonder. We’re a fully insured tree company with years of professional experience. Since 1989, our team of certified arborists has proudly provided tree service in northern New Jersey.

We can’t wait to serve you, too. To learn more about our expert tree services, contact us at (973) 678-8888.

Why Your Tree Company Should Have Insurance

When it comes to hiring a tree company, there are many things to look for. 

For starters, you should consider their experience and reviews of former customers. You’ll also want to learn about their specific services, like tree pruning or tree planting. And then, of course, you’ll want to consider the actual cost of their professional services.

But before you can move forward, there’s one more box that needs to be checked: insurance. 

After all, if you hire a tree company without full insurance coverage, you’ll simply create a recipe for disaster.

In this article, we’ll break down the reasons why your tree company should always have insurance.

The Nature of Working with Mother Nature

First, it helps to understand the liability that comes with tree service work.

The tree care field is one of the most dangerous industries in the country. From extreme heights to electrical lines, workers are regularly exposed to high-risk situations. Tree care employees are also required to operate sharp and heavy equipment.

The job is even more dangerous after storms, when conditions are more slippery than usual.

Most importantly, Mother Nature is unpredictable. A dying tree branch, for example, can fall without warning. This is why it’s crucial to work with an experienced and knowledgeable tree service company like Friendly Tree.

Insurance Protects Both You and the Tree Company 

Due to the dangerous nature of tree care, it’s critical to hire a company that has insurance. Specifically, they should have general liability insurance and workers’ compensation.

If a tree worker is injured on your property, workers’ compensation will cover their medical bills. But if they get hurt on your property and don’t have insurance, the company or worker can potentially sue you.

Plus, if you knowingly hire a company without insurance, your home insurance probably won’t pay the claim.

Insurance also protects against structural damages. For instance, if a tree worker prunes a tree and a heavy branch falls on your roof or car, their insurance will cover it.

Of course, no one wants accidents or injuries to happen. However, anything is possible, and it’s always best to be prepared.

Your Tree Company Should Also Have Certified Arborists and Tree Experts

In addition to insurance, your tree company should also have certified and licensed tree experts.

These experts have completed a high standard of training, licensing, and certifications. This ensures that they’ll get the job done — and do it right.

It also means that they have received proper safety training, thus reducing the risk of injuries and accidents.

Keep this in mind if another business, like a landscaping company, attempts to offer you tree services. While they might have insurance, their workers aren’t professional trained to handle the job.

Moreover, their insurance likely won’t cover the same scenarios tree workers encounter each day.

Call the Friendly Experts at Friendly Tree

As you can see, there are many reasons why your tree company should have insurance. It protects everyone involved, from the client to the business.

With Friendly Tree, you won’t have to wonder. We’re a fully insured tree company with years of professional experience. Since 1989, our team of certified arborists has proudly provided tree service in northern New Jersey.

We can’t wait to serve you, too. To learn more about our expert tree services, contact us at (973) 678-8888.

Tree Stump Grinding: What It Is and Why You Might Need It

As a homeowner, you’ve likely heard all about tree planting, pruning, and removal. Planting new trees, after all, is one of the best ways to enhance the natural beauty of your property. Pruning is an essential part of tree care, while removal is crucial for getting rid of old or dead trees.

But what about tree stump grinding? Some homeowners aren’t aware that it’s even necessary. 

Let’s look at what tree stump grinding is and why you might need it.

Tree Stump Grinding 101

Tree stump grinding is a stump removal technique.

It involves a machine that grates the stump until it’s just below the soil. In some cases, the stump can be grinded as deep as 12 inches (or more) below the surface. This creates a discrete hole in the ground, letting you re-purpose the area.

The process of tree stump grinding takes just a few minutes. It also produces wood chip mulch, which is placed in the hole for 2 to 3 months. These wood chips steal nitrogen and other nutrients from the area before they start to decompose.

From there, you can spread the wood chips in areas like your garden, planting beds, and walkways. How’s that for resourcefulness?

While stump grinding leaves behind the roots, you won’t have to handle them. They’ll naturally break down in about 10 years.

 

Tree Stump Grinding Improves Aesthetics and Safety

Tree removal naturally leaves behind a stump. This leftover base can be visually unattractive, especially if your lawn is perfectly landscaped.

Mold, weeds, and insects could also grow on a tree stump and diminish your property’s curb appeal. Plus, if pests and diseases aren’t controlled, they can spread to other plants.

Most importantly, a tree stump is a safety hazard. Since most stumps are just a couple inches high, it’s easy to trip over one. This is dangerous for both kids and adults alike.

Tree stumps also make it difficult to properly mow the lawn. And even if a lawn mower makes it over the stump, there’s a major risk of machine damage.

Tree Stump Grinding vs. Tree Stump Removal

Tree stump grinding is just one technique for removing a tree stump. The other method is tree stump removal, which involves digging up the stump and its roots.

Compared to grinding, tree stump removal is more invasive. It takes more time, money, and powerful machines. Complete removal of a tree stump also leaves a bigger hole in the ground.

On the flipside, this hole offers more of a blank slate than stump grinding. It’s easier to “start over” if you totally remove the stump.

Call the Expert Tree Technicians at Friendly Tree

There isn’t a one-size-fits-all approach for dealing with a tree stump. The best choice depends on your property and what you plan to do with the area.

Luckily, with Friendly Tree, you’ll have personalized guidance every step of the way. Our professional tree technicians in New Jersey are ready to learn about your needs. We’ll also explain what tree stump grinding is and why you might need it.

When the time comes, we can also provide other tree services like tree trimming and tree planting.

For a friendly consultation with Friendly Tree, contact us at (973) 678-8888.

How Trees Help Retain (and Reduce) Stormwater Runoff

Trees offer countless environmental benefits. For example, they cleanse the air by producing oxygen and absorbing carbon dioxide. They also provide homes and food for animals like birds and squirrels. Needless to say, trees can bring immense value and advantages to a natural landscape.

But the benefits of trees don’t stop there. Trees also retain and reduce stormwater runoff, one of the biggest issues of urban and suburban areas. This means they can play a significant role in protecting the local environment.

Why Is Stormwater Runoff an Issue?

We all know rain is important. It replenishes our water sources, “feeds” rivers and lakes, and keeps our grass green and healthy. Rain also provides essential nutrients for agricultural crops and beautiful trees.

The problem is when rain becomes stormwater runoff. This happens when rainfall or melting snow flows over paved surfaces like roads, parking lots, and driveways. Since these surfaces are impermeable, they don’t soak up water. The result is a large volume of water flowing over ground surfaces.

Here’s why this can be bad news:

Flooding and Erosion

If rapid runoff flows into bodies of water, it can disrupt the natural flow and damage local animal habitats. It can also worsen the severity of flooding in urban and suburban neighborhoods.

Sewage Problems

Stormwater runoff can overwhelm local sewage systems, which are full of harmful pathogens and heavy metals. This presents serious public health concerns.

Pollution

When stormwater passes over paved surfaces, it picks up pollutants like pesticides, pet waste, lawn fertilizer, and byproducts from construction sites. The water then pushes these pollutants into local streams and rivers.

Excess Sediment

Similarly, fast-moving runoff forces sediment and residue into bodies of water. This can destroy natural habitats and block sunlight from underwater plant life.

Trees and Stormwater Runoff

While paved surfaces don’t mix well with rainfall, they’re essential components of developed neighborhoods. It’d be difficult to travel around town without surfaces like roads and sidewalks.

The solution? Plant new trees and take care of existing ones. Aside from beautifying our properties and streets, trees can manage stormwater runoff.

They can:

Retain Water

A tree provides a surface for rain to land on. Specifically, its leaves and bark can “intercept” and retain rainfall. This water will then evaporate or end up in the soil.

Decrease Erosion

Likewise, tree canopies intercept rainfall and reduce the risk of erosion.

Absorb Moisture

Water can also collect on fallen leaves. Eventually, the moisture will permeate the soil instead of flowing over paved surfaces.

Roots also absorb the water and aerate the soil, which soaks up moisture. This reduces the accumulation of runoff after a storm.

Plant New Trees and Reduce Stormwater Runoff

You can’t control the weather, but you can control how your property handles heavy rainfall. That’s why it’s important to plant trees to retain and reduce stormwater runoff.

However, managing runoff doesn’t stop at planting new trees. It also involves taking care of the trees you already have. By keeping your existing trees healthy, you can do your part in reducing stormwater runoff.

Friendly Tree is here to help. As a team of certified arborists, we offer professional tree planting services in New Jersey. We also know what it takes to help trees thrive and flourish.

To get a quote or schedule a consultation, contact Friendly Tree at (973) 678-8888.

Building Near Trees: Do’s and Don’ts

If you already have trees on your property, you might wonder about the best practices for adding new buildings. Perhaps you just bought land and you’d like to build a home. Or, maybe you’d like to renovate and expand an existing structure. Regardless of the situation, it’s important to know the do’s and don’ts of building near trees.

This will ensure the structure is built in a way that protects and preserves the structure of each tree. Besides, the last thing you want to do is damage the precious plants during construction!

Before starting your new project, consider these guidelines for building near trees.

DO…

Properly Prune Trees

When it’s time to bring in the construction equipment, you might want to prune your trees to make more space. But if you’re not 100% sure how to trim the branches, this simple move may cause significant harm.

That’s why it’s crucial to practice proper tree pruning techniques. Incorrect pruning can create “wounds” that increase the tree’s vulnerability to harmful insects. Plus, if sap leaks out the wounds, the tree will be robbed of nutrients.A certified arborist can make sure your trees are properly pruned before construction.

 

Control Nearby Traffic

Prior to building a new structure, make a plan to protect the tree and its roots.

It’s generally recommended to build a fence around the dripline, or the outermost circumference of the canopy’s edge. (This measurement is called the “dripline” because this is where water drips from the canopy to the ground). An even better move is to place the fence further out from the dripline.

By adding a fence around your tree, you can limit physical damage and keep construction machinery away.

 

Consider Designing Around the Tree

More and more architects are incorporating existing trees into homes, decks, and commercial buildings. This means the trees can stay practically untouched! For example, a deck can be built with a circular opening around a tree.

Of course, this depends on the type of tree and what you are planning to build. Your arborist, builder, and architect can work together to create a design that works for your needs.

 

DON’T…

Trim the Roots

You might be tempted to trim the tree’s roots in order to make more space. After all, the roots will simply re-grow around the building… right?

Well, not quite. An established root system is extremely complex. If certain roots are removed, the tree may lose its stability, resulting in damage or failure later on. Incorrect root cutting can also deprive the tree of nutrients and water.

Before snipping the roots, consult a professional tree service like Friendly Tree. A certified arborist will be able to determine which roots are safe to cut.

 

Add Concrete on Roots

It’s not recommended to add concrete (or stones) on an established root system. This can rob the roots of oxygen, nutrients, and water, which will ultimately lead to failure.

For best results, work with a professional concrete company. They’ll know how to handle the roots in a way that allows the tree to thrive.

 

Dig Trenches Too Close

When building a new structure, you’ll likely need an irrigation system. However, digging trenches within the dripline — or near the tree trunk — can interfere with almost half of the tree’s roots.

Fortunately, it’s possible to dig trenches without harming the roots. The best option is to dig them outside of the drip line, but you can also trench toward the trunk and tunnel underneath. A third option is to trench a third into the dripline and connect the trenches by tunnelling.

There are many do’s and don’ts of building near trees. But with a professional tree service like Friendly Tree, you can take proper precautions before starting construction.

 

Our certified arborists in New Jersey can make sure the process leaves your trees unharmed. With over 27 years of experience, our team knows precisely what to look for! We’re also happy to provide professional tree services, including tree removal, tree planting, and more.

Have questions? Contact Friendly Tree at (973) 678-8888 to get a quote or schedule a consultation.

What Kind of Tree Should I Plant?

So, you decided to plant a new tree. Congratulations! This is the start of a beautiful landscape that will increase the aesthetics and value of your property.

But before you start mapping your dream garden, it’s important to know what kind of tree you should plant. This depends on the environment you’re planting in. Remember, every tree has different requirements, so it should be planted in an area that meets those needs.

Your climate isn’t the only factor, though. The characteristics of your property matter as well. From existing greenery to nearby pipes, there are many environmental aspects to consider.

 

Before buying a tree or digging a hole, take the time to do some research. By learning how to choose the best tree for your area, you can ensure it will thrive for years to come. Here are several factors to consider.

 

Temperature

As you know, North America is a continent of extremely different climates. Therefore, in order to help folks choose the appropriate trees for their area, the USDA created The Plant Hardiness Zones.

 

Each zone represents an area in the United States or Canada. The zones are divided based on an area’s lowers annual average temperature. In each zone, there are specific trees that can endure the winters in that area.

 

Before buying and planting a new tree, find your plant hardiness zone. There are 11 zones in total. All you need to do is visit a hardiness zone map and enter your zip code.

 

Rainfall

When it comes to moisture, every type of tree has different needs. Some trees require constantly wet soil, while others prefer a dry environment. As a result, it’s vital to consider your area’s natural rain patterns throughout the year.

 

Be sure to acknowledge nearby bodies of water, too. Ponds, for example, will affect the level of moisture in the surrounding soil.

 

Soil

From clay to sand, soil isn’t a one-size-fits-all component. Every soil has different biological, chemical, and physical characteristics, so you must choose the appropriate trees for your soil type.

Granted, things like pH and draining can be altered with various substances. For instance, you can improve soil drainage by adding organic matter like compost. But for optimal results, it’s wise to pick the most appropriate plants for your property’s soil.

 

Available Space

Every property is unique, regardless of climate or state. So, be sure to acknowledge the different aspects of your land.

Think about your available space and nearby trees, shrubs, or plants. Over time, the tree’s root system will attempt to establish itself, so it’s essential to provide enough space for both new and existing plants. This will ensure that they don’t have to compete for water and nutrients.

 

Existing Constraints

Before choosing a tree, consider any existing underground pipes and power lines. Don’t forget about your driveway, sidewalk, and neighbors. Lastly, check any local ordinances and rules as to how far a tree must be planted from the street.

With these environmental aspects in mind, you can determine if you should get a small, medium, or large tree. You’ll also be able to figure out what kind of canopy and foliage will work well with the area.

 

We’re Here to Help You Choose the Best Trees for Your Property

If you’re not sure what kind of tree you should plant, consult the professionals at Friendly Tree. Since 1989, we’ve offered tree planting services throughout northern New Jersey. We’ll take the time to choose the best species for your property and needs.

 

This way, you don’t have to worry about all the details on this list. Leave it up to us! Our team of professional arborists knows exactly what to look for.

For a free quote, contact Friendly Tree at (973) 678-8888.

Keeping Your Trees Pest Free

Now that summer is near, New Jerseyans are coming out of the woodwork to soak up the warm weather and sunshine. Unfortunately, so are the pests.

We believe the best approach to pest management starts with healthy, vigorous trees. While few trees are entirely pest-free, healthy trees are much more capable of resisting pests and the damage they cause.

It is rare for a truly vigorous tree to succumb to pests. Here are five key steps you can take to keep the trees on your property free from insect infestations:

Ensure Good Soil Conditions

Perhaps the most significant thing you can do for your trees gives them rich, healthy soil to grow in. Ideally, you should have species well suited to your region’s growing conditions and soil type. Proper drainage is key to avoiding pest problems, and adding compost yearly will provide your trees with the nutrients they need to grow strong.

Be sure not to over-fertilize, as an excess of nitrogen can actually steal nutrients from the soil and leave trees susceptible to pests and disease. Controlling weeds will also help to limit the habitat for creepy crawlies.

Water Correctly

Believe it or not, overwatering is actually more prevalent (and deadly) to trees in urban areas. Too much water can not only cause root rot but invites conditions for pests and disease. Trees with too little water, however, become stressed and vulnerable. Moist, but well-drained, the soil is preferable. Learn how to properly water your trees.

 Prune Properly

Regular pruning is one of the best gifts you can give your trees to keep them healthy. Good air circulation in the tree’s canopy is important for warding off infections and infestations. However, when done incorrectly, pruning can actually leave open “wounds” for insects to enter and attack. Pruning done by a certified tree service or arborist will ensure that the branch collar – which contains specialized cells to help the tree heal properly – stays intact.

Don’t Overmulch

Mulch can be a tree’s best friend, but only if you do it right. Mulching too deep can lead to root rot in wet or heavy soils, making the tree susceptible to infestations. Mulching during the late fall, right before the ground freezes, should also be avoided, as it provides a home for pests to overwinter. Read how to mulch your trees the right way.

Clean up in the Fall

Insects and other pests love to hide out in fallen leaves, decaying branches, and fallen fruit. Once the summer season comes to a close, remove any leaves, branches, twigs, seed pods, fruit (on or off the tree) or anything else littering your landscape. If you see the diseased material, dispose of it in the trash. Keeping the ground clean can deter pests from hibernating in your yard for the winter.

What About Spraying?

At Friendly Tree, we believe the first line of defense when it comes to pest control is preventative action. However, if you find yourself fighting an uphill battle with infestations, insecticidal soaps can be particularly effective against aphids, spider mites, whiteflies, thrips, mealybugs and other common pests. We typically encourage avoiding chemical pesticides, as they can do more harm than good if not applied by a professional.

Proactive care really does go a long way in keeping your trees healthy and pest free. If your tree has a bad infestation, it may need to be inspected by a professional and potentially removed.

If your trees need troubleshooting, we can help. Our inspections and assessments are always free.

5 Common Tree Planting Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

With Earth Day just around the corner, tree planting is on the horizon for many home and property owners in New Jersey. Did you know that the best way to ensure your new tree’s long-term health and happiness is with a good start? In this article, we’ll explain how to avoid the most common tree planting mistakes.

When it comes to tree planting, there is a right way and a wrong way. Improper planting methods may set your tree up for poor growth and future structural problems. Following proper methods will allow it to reach its full potential and ultimately, require less maintenance and troubleshooting later on.

Are You Making These 5 Common Tree Planting Mistakes?

Tree Planting Mistake #1. Planting Too Deep

Planting too deep is a common reason for tree decline. In fact, one study found that more than 90 percent of professionally planted trees were planted too deep. Burying the tree’s root collar, either by planting it too deep or by volcano mulching, can cause reduced growth, defoliation, leaf yellowing, girdling roots, branch dieback and even tree death.

Although the tree may seem fine at first, these symptoms can take years to appear. If your tree’s flare is covered – and if it resembles a telephone pole in the ground – it’s buried too deep.

What to do Instead: A good rule of thumb is to never dig the planting hole deeper than the height of the tree’s root ball. Keep the tree’s root flare exposed and keep mulch away from the base of the tree.

Tree Planting Mistake #2. Digging a Hole Too Small

On the other side of the coin is the width of the planting hole. It can be tempting to dig a hole the width of the tree’s root ball – after all, digging is hard work! But planting a tree in a hole that’s too small stifles the growth of new roots and and doesn’t allow them to take hold in the soil as it continues to grow. Newly planted trees in small holes are less stable and have a hard time building a robust root system. Trees in this situation are easily blown over in storms.

What to Do Instead: When it comes to the width of the planting hole, here’s where you’ll want to go big. Dig a shallow hole that is two to three times wider than the root ball. While it may take more time and energy, it’s worth it to create a planting site which will allow your tree’s roots to spread, and will result in fewer problems down the road.

Tree Planting Mistake #3. Planting the Wrong Time of Year

While it may be tempting to take care of all your landscaping tasks in the summer when the sun is shining and the grass is green, summer is one of the worst times to plant a young tree. The summer’s heat can cause extra stress, which makes trees more susceptible to pests and disease (both of which are more active in the warmer months). On the other hand, planting just before freezing temperatures hit can also stress your new tree.

What to do Instead: Spring (after the risk of a hard frost has passed) and fall, especially, are both great times for tree planting in New Jersey. Moderate temperatures, warm soil and cool nights ease a newly planted tree into its new environment and limit potential stressors.

Tree Planting Mistake #4. Choosing the Wrong Planting Site

Now, here’s where the phrase, “Bloom where you are planted” just doesn’t work. Trees have very specific growing requirements and can’t be expected to simply grow anywhere.

Trees requiring full sun will not do well in another tree’s shade, or on the north side of a large structure. Trees with high water needs may suffer if they are planted on a slope, where water easily drains off. All trees have their favorite soil type, and many are sensitive to cold or hot temperatures.

Another commonly overlooked factor is planting a tree too close to structures, sidewalks or driveways. It may look little now, but your tree will develop an extensive root system and some species can grow very quickly. You could end up running into problems with power lines or plumbing.

What to do Instead: Do your due diligence and research your property’s soil type, soil chemistry, drainage and hardiness zone. Then, choose a tree that is looking for the same things. Before digging, always provide plenty of clearance for power lines and structures, and call your utility company to mark underground lines.

Tree Planting Mistake #5. Improper Watering

This may come as a surprise, but more newly planted trees die from overwatering than not enough water. In clay soils, especially, drainage can suffocate the tree’s roots. Improper watering can drown your young tree, or cause it to dry out in the hottest part of the summer. And, believe it or not, trees also require water in the winter, especially those that were planted the season prior.

What to do Instead: The rule of thumb for watering trees is slow, deep and infrequent. Water your tree at planting, again the next day, and then every three days for the next couple of weeks. Once established, trees should be watered to a depth of one foot at the drip line. Water more often during the summer and dry spells, and keep in mind your soil type when watering. Clay soil needs longer watering intervals because it absorbs water poorly, while sandy soil needs shorter intervals more often. Don’t forget to water your tree during dry spells in the winter; even though your tree is dormant, it still requires water to survive.

A new tree is an investment, and cutting corners during tree planting may prove to be very costly later on. If you’re not sure where to start, give us a call.

Friendly Tree Service has been planting trees in New Jersey for 27 years. We hand pick trees from our specialized growers from around the country and can help you select the best type of tree for your landscape, deliver it safely to your property and plant it properly for long-term success. We offer not just a survival guarantee, but a thrive guarantee!

Why Fall is the Best Time for Tree Planting in New Jersey

As we wave goodbye to summer and welcome the colorful days of autumn, it’s not quite time to put away the garden tools. In addition to cleaning up the yard – removing debris and raking up spent leaves – you might want to add tree planting to your to-do list this fall.

Here at Friendly Tree, we talk a lot about the benefits trees provide to a home or property – including reducing energy bills and increasing property value. One of the most important factors in determining when to plant trees is the climate (in addition to the tree planting site).

Trees need the right combination of temperature and moisture to establish a healthy root system for proper growth.

What Makes Fall a Good Time to Plant?

Newly planted trees need a little extra attention to get them off to a good start. Remember – in many cases, your tree has lost a good amount of its root system during transplanting.

In most areas of the U.S., the dry days of summer have passed but freezing temperatures have not yet arrived. The moderate daytime temperatures, cool nights, warm soil and increased rainfall means right now is the perfect time for tree planting in New Jersey.

Leaves prefer cooler, more moderate temperatures because the summer sun can drain energy from the leaves as well as the rest of the tree. Underground, the warm soil accelerates new root growth for a healthy root system before the tree goes dormant.

With the cold months ahead, your new tree can shift its resources into developing its root system and storing nutrients instead of producing new foliage. Once spring arrives, your new tree’s roots will be vigorous and well-established, giving it a better chance of getting through the summer months.

Just don’t wait too long – your trees need time to acclimate to their new location. Sudden frigid temperatures soon after planting can stress a young tree. We recommend getting your new tree in the ground before mid-October.

What About Summer?

Some homeowners make the mistake of thinking that all landscaping tasks should happen in the summer, when the grass is green and trees have fully leafed out.

While it is possible to plant in the summer, trees will require extra watering and may show signs of stress from the heat and intense sun. In fact, trees can actually get sunburned (known as phototoxic burn)! When trees are stressed, they are more susceptible to pests, diseases and overall poor growth.

Can I Plant in the Spring?

Yes, you can. In fact, spring is the second best time of year for tree planting. In the springtime, when the risk of a hard frost has passed, temperatures are generally mild and trees have a chance to grow all spring, summer and fall before settling down for the winter.

At this time, however, they must produce a flush of new leaves and develop their roots at the same time. This intense growth can be taxing on a young tree and also requires extra watering, especially during dry spells.

How do I Choose a Tree Species?

Friendly Tree can help! Give us a call and we can help you determine which trees will do best in our area of New Jersey and in your specific planting site.

You can also visit the Arbor Day Foundation website and try out their helpful Tree Wizard tool, which gives you recommendations based on your property’s growing conditions, hardiness zone and personal preferences.

When deciding on tree species, it’s important to think about how much space (vertically and horizontally) your tree will have and how much water it will receive in that particular location. Choosing a tree based on the site requirements will give you a better chance at success.

Regardless of tree type, don’t forget to water during the winter! Some winters can turn out to be very dry, so keep an eye on soil conditions and water your new tree when needed. Even though the tree is dormant, its roots still need moisture to continue to grow.

Need help with tree planting? Call the New Jersey tree planting experts at Friendly Tree.

We also invite you to explore more of our blog for arborist advice on watering, mulching and pruning your new tree.

Tree Pruning and Removal: Why You Should Hire a Certified Arborist

As a home or property owner, you’re familiar with the seemingly never ending expenses that crop up throughout the year. While it is certainly wise to learn a few skills and accomplish some of these tasks on your own, tree pruning and removal should not be on your DIY list.

Tree trimming and removal are dangerous tasks. In fact, the chance of injury for tree care professionals is three times higher than for those in the police or fire industries. (Source) When it comes to the trees on your property, play it safe and hire a professional.

Four Reasons to Hire a Certified Arborist

1. Improper pruning causes more harm than good and can even kill your tree.

We have a saying here at Friendly Tree Service: “Pruning is a science as much as it is an art.” In fact, it’s better not to prune at all than to prune incorrectly. Every year, more trees are killed or damaged from improper pruning than from insects and pests.

Each individual tree has its own requirements as far as which cuts need to be made, and where. A skilled arborist knows which limbs are weak or diseased, and how they should be trimmed. He knows how to make training cuts to develop the tree’s natural shape or fill in an open area, and he knows how to eliminate weak spots so that the rest of the tree grows healthy and strong.

Trained arborists also understand when minor trimming or aggressive pruning is needed, and they know how to properly remove dead or diseased trees safely – without endangering themselves, other people or the property.

2. Tree pruning and removal is more dangerous than you think.

Unfortunately, many well-meaning people think as long as you have a good saw, anyone can prune a tree. This line of thinking can lead to serious injuries and even fatalities from falls, falling trees or branches, contact with power lines and injuries from cutting equipment.

Still not convinced? Here are some statistics provided by ArborGlobal.com:

  • The risk of serious accident for a tree worker is 1:120
  • Tree workers experience 6 deaths per 100 accidents
  • The fatality rate in Arboriculture is 35 deaths per 100,000 workers per year, compared to the average fatality rate for all industries of 4 deaths/100,000 workers per year

Sometimes trees only show minimal signs of damage; it takes a highly trained eye to know if the tree is hazardous and poses a serious risk. A trained professional understands how to recognize a hazardous tree and the safest method to remove it. Certified arborists, like those at Friendly Tree, have been trained in safe tree pruning and removal practices and know how to limit the impact to your property.

3. Arborists have the necessary equipment and training.

Professional arborists have tree cranes that allow them to reach large or difficult to access trees and branches. At Friendly Tree, our crane can reach more than 150 feet away and can lift up to 42 tons! Our arborists have the necessary training and experience to handle our advanced tree care equipment without injuring themselves or others.

At Friendly Tree, we follow the highest ANSI Z133 and OSHA standards for workplace safety, which are recognized in the U.S. as the primary safety standards for pruning, repairing, maintaining or removing trees or brush. These standards are reviewed and updated every five years and ensure that trees and equipment are handled in the safest way possible.

4. A certified arborist will have liability and insurance that protect you and your assets.

Imagine if a large, heavy branch crashed down on your roof – or your neighbors’ – during tree pruning. Are you protected?

A reputable tree care service will carry liability insurance, which protects you and your property from damage, and workers compensation insurance, which protects tree care professionals in the field. Any arborist you hire should have a minimum of $1,000,000 in liability and workers compensation insurance. Check to make sure your name and address are added to the Certificate of Insurance before any work has begun.

At Friendly Tree, we don’t cut corners – our certified arborists put the safety of you, your home and your property first, not our bottom line. Our stringent adherence to ANSI standards and our crew’s combined 239 years of experience means we can guarantee our work is safe and of the highest quality.

Need help with tree pruning or removal? Give us a call. We can recommend the most appropriate action for the trees in your landscape, and our inspections and assessments are always free.